Lifestyle

Michigan residents can adopt a fuzzy quarantine companion for $25, get arms-length vet care


March 18, 2020, 6:46 PM by  Jack Thomas
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Photo: Michigan Humane Society

Michigan residents seeking four-legged companionship can now adopt for $25 at select shelters.

Starting today, nearly 30 shelters around the state are participating in an Empty the Shelters adoption special, sponsored by Bissell Pet Foundation. Residents can sign up to adopt online on any of the participating shelters' websites, find a pet and schedule an appointment with shelter staff.

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Michigan animal shelters are scrambling to adapt as COVID-19 measures tighten. Many are relying on foster families to temporarily care for animals as foot traffic becomes restricted.

Beginning Friday, the Michigan Humane Society is changing its veterinary operations to a drive-up model, said MHS spokesman Andy Bissonette. Owners can drive to a tent, where they'll meet with a staff member and explain their pet’s symptoms. The staff member will bring the pet into the clinic for treatment. The owner will not need to leave their vehicle.

Additionally, the MHS Livingston County location is closing, because of low volume, Bissonette said.

The organization suspended pet adoptions beginning March 14.

Since then, a vast number of volunteers have agreed to foster these pets for the time being. Offices are recieving over 100 voicemails a day, said Bissonette. They’ve also seen an uptick in donations.

Penny the cat offers "virtual cuddles" and "head boops" to anyone in need of love. (Video: MHS Facebook) 

The organization asks owners to limit appointments to urgent issues. Any routine visits, including shots or vaccinations, have been postponed one month.

Owners unable to purchase pet supplies can come to a pet food pantry in Detroit on Trumbull between 9 a.m. and noon on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.



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